wilwheaton

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

sfmoma
sfmoma:

A poem for Earth Day:
No ArgumentBILL BERKSON
As cicadas split hairs at sunset
      skidmarks reel off frilly increments
               lifting on high the clear carnal sea

Pure Saturnalia––be captivated if you can
     with that approximate yearning for borders
              like when you first heard the music whispered low

What it was was Sprechstimme
     echo of life’s primordial Kunstwollen
               blank check of the air

I always thought a tree house was involved
     the secret loves of a chainlink fence
               you stand mesmerized

while the beholders scatter
     their potshots getting cozier
               on the last meteor out

Ancestral faces hang on the old oak tree of a cloud
     time out of reach for the main complaint
               omit the wake-up stifle any kindred sense of smell

A film is gathering of exceedingly correct proportions
     to puncture maybe tumble into
               not even once

sfmoma:

A poem for Earth Day:

No Argument
BILL BERKSON

As cicadas split hairs at sunset
      skidmarks reel off frilly increments
               lifting on high the clear carnal sea

Pure Saturnalia––be captivated if you can
     with that approximate yearning for borders
              like when you first heard the music whispered low

What it was was Sprechstimme
     echo of life’s primordial Kunstwollen
               blank check of the air

I always thought a tree house was involved
     the secret loves of a chainlink fence
               you stand mesmerized

while the beholders scatter
     their potshots getting cozier
               on the last meteor out

Ancestral faces hang on the old oak tree of a cloud
     time out of reach for the main complaint
               omit the wake-up stifle any kindred sense of smell

A film is gathering of exceedingly correct proportions
     to puncture maybe tumble into
               not even once